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VERIFY: The COVID-19 vaccine does not cause issues with fertility, pregnancy, or having a baby

The CDC, WHO, and Maine CDC Director Dr. Nirav Shah all debunked the myth that the vaccine can cause fertility issues.

PORTLAND, Maine — Federal and state health officials addressed a rumor that the COVID-19 vaccine can cause fertility or pregnancy issues.

The U.S. CDC, World Health Organization, and state public health departments are combatting the claim, saying there is no evidence to show the vaccine impacts someone wanting or trying to have a baby.

The CDC said:

"There is currently no evidence that COVID-19 vaccination causes any problems with pregnancy, including the development of the placenta. In addition, there is no evidence that fertility problems are a side effect of any vaccine, including COVID-19 vaccines."

The WHO also tackled this issue in a recurring series debunking myths on the COVID-19 vaccine.

"The vaccines we give cannot cause infertility. This is a rumor that has gone around about many different vaccines," said Dr. Katherine O'Brien, WHO Director of the Department of Immunization, Vaccines, and Biologicals. "There's no truth to the rumor. There's no vaccine that causes infertility."

Maine CDC Director Dr. Nirav Shah also fielded the question during Thursday's media briefing.

"There's absolutely no evidence to support that [vaccines cause infertility]," said Shah. "In the clinical trials for both Pfizer and Moderna's vaccines, the vaccine was found to be perfectly safe, and the pregnancy was uncomplicated."

Harvard Medical School put out a publication about several common questions related to the COVID-19 vaccine and pregnancy, including:

  • What do we know about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines in people who are pregnant? 
  • What to consider about COVID-19 vaccines if you’re pregnant 
  • What to consider if you’re thinking of becoming pregnant soon or in the future 

The article provides more context that there is no evidence that the vaccines have any effect on pregnant women, their babies, or women hoping to become pregnant.