x
Breaking News
More () »

Maine's Leading Local News: Weather, Traffic, Sports and more | Maine | NewsCenterMaine.com

VERIFY: Is it actually legal to ride scooters and bikes on DC sidewalks shared by pedestrians?

Electric scooters and bikes are a big deal in DC. But one viewer wanted to know is it actually legal to ride scooters and bicycles on city walkways?

QUESTION:

Is it legal to ride scooters and bikes on DC sidewalks?

ANSWER:

It is legal for scooters and bicycles to ride on certain city sidewalks where pedestrians are, but it’s not allowed within the Central Business District in DC.

SOURCES:

District Department of Transportation Public Information Officer: Terry Owens

PROCESS:

See something you're skeptical of? Well that's why our Verify team is here, to help get you the answers you need to know.

Commuter, Nicole from Upper Marlboro, said she's seen close calls between scooters and bicycles almost colliding with people, on sidewalks in  the Federal Center area in Southwest DC.

She wants to know is it legal to ride scooters and bicycles on city walkways for pedestrians?

To find out, Verify researchers first looked at the DC Code, which states riding electric scooters and regular bicycles are allowed on the sidewalk as long as you stay outside the Central Business District seen here on this map below.

Credit: DDOT

The Central Business District is restricted by 2nd Street NE and SE, D Street SE and SW, 14th Street SW and NW, Constitution Ave NW, 23rd Street NW, and Massachusetts Ave NW.

The exceptions inside the C.B.D where scooter and bike riding are permitted, include National Mall and DuPont Circle, Lafayette Park, Farragut Square Park.

A DC Department of Transportation spokesperson confirmed electric bicycles that can go above 30 miles per hour are not allowed on any city sidewalks.

Metropolitan Police Department enforces the law and if you get caught riding where you are not supposed to, it's a $25 fine.

So, we verified it is legal for scooters and bicycles to ride on certain city sidewalks where pedestrians are, but you should not ride them within the Central Business District in D.C.

Sign up for the Get Up DC newsletter: Your forecast. Your commute. Your news.