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From a vasectomy to watering cattle, Mainers reflect on the Ice Storm of '98

The roar of the chainsaws and snapping of trees are some of the first things that come to mind when we think back on the days following the Ice Storm of '98. Every Mainer you meet has their own unique memory though.

BANGOR (NEWS CENTER Maine) – The roar of the chainsaws and snapping of trees are some of the first things that come to mind when we think back on the days following the Ice Storm of '98. Every Mainer you meet has their own unique memory though.

From a man determined to get a vasectomy to driving a snowmobile to the store, we dug around for some of the best.

"We've never lived anything like that,” Doug Gross said. "For a few days it was a bit of a romantic part of it being in the olden days, but that got old."

Gross and his wife Margaret said they remember having to get water to their cows.

"We had to water them by hand. We were bringing up like 400 gallons a day in a five-gallon bucket,” Gross said.

"It was a long eight nine days it really was,” Doug's wife Margaret said.

That was not the only difficult task. Even the simpler things became more difficult, like going to the grocery store.

"I mean it was only a mile down the street – but you couldn't get there with our vehicles so down we went with our snowmobiles,” Debra Brackett said.

She remembered the time to be somewhat fun because it forced people to make the best with what they had.

"We had a foot of ice!” Brackett said.

With that ice, there were all the headaches.

Hundreds of others shared their memories with us on Facebook, including Sherry Reynolds.

"We get there and it's just the doctor. No receptionist, no nurse, no nothing,” Reynolds said.

While some couples were having babies in the midst of the storm, Sherry Reynolds and her husband were making the trek to get a vasectomy. Let's just say they were not about to let the storm stop them.

"My husband was determined to make this appointment. Other than the doctor calling to say he wasn't coming in, nothing was going to stop him from going,” she laughed.

Whether it was traveling to the doctor or making it to the Aerosmith concert in Portland, Mainers 'were not going to miss a thing.' The exception: school.

"It was fun for me. I'm sure my older brother whose four years old than me was out of school for those days,” Taylor Gosselin said.

Gosselin was just a kid at the time. She shared her vivid memory of her family's basement flooding and still trudging through the water for an important mission.

"So I put on my dad's old firefighter boots which went basically all the way up my leg because I was three and went splashing through the water to feed rabbits,”

Together hundreds upon hundreds of stories were shared—all moments now frozen in time.

"If you lived here it's in your memory. It's one you'll never forget,” Gross said.