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Maine Mall-sized solar farm considered in Gorham

Nexamp, a leader in clean energy, presented a pre-application for the proposed solar farm site in Gorham.

GORHAM, Maine — While still in the very preliminary stages of the process, Nexamp, a leader in clean energy located in Boston, has presented a pre-application for a proposed solar farm off Fort Hill Road in Gorham.

According to the Gorham Times, the presentation of the proposed 32-acre solar farm, called the Fort Hill Road Solar Project occurred at the Planning Board meeting on Feb. 3.

This would be the first of its kind in Maine for Nexamp, and a first for the Town of Gorham. The passage of LD1711 in Oct. 2019  "An Act to Promote Solar Energy Projects and Distributed Generation Resources in Maine" has made options for renewable energy more possible in our state.

Nexamp is seeking approval to construct a 6.5 megawatt PV Solar Ground-Based Array at 412 Fort Hill Road. This would include equipment, gravel access, perimeter fence and utility poles. " The goal is to minimize earthwork as much as possible, " site engineer, Christoper Ryan, of Meridian Associates reported to the Gorham Times.

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Many Gorham residents have expressed concerns and questions about the proposed solar farm. Approval for this project will involve a multi-step process and public hearings that would address Planning Board members' and residents' questions.

"Gorham supports sustainability of the environment and natural resources while being open to considering new technologies or new ideas to enhance the community's sustainability and improve the living environment," Planning Board member, Scott Firmin, told the Gorham Times.

Nexamp is prepared to break ground as early as fall 2020. Once approved the project is expected to take four to six months to build.

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