x
Breaking News
More () »

Real-time Maine coronavirus updates: Sunday, November 1

Find developments on the Maine coronavirus, COVID-19 outbreak as we work together to separate facts from fear. Saturday, October 31, 2020.

MAINE, USA — KEY MAINE CORONAVIRUS FACTS

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 1 

Maine CDC issued the following statement when reporting Sunday's numbers:

A disruption on Saturday in the data delivery system that reports COVID-19 test results from labs to Maine CDC caused today’s website update to include fewer cases than would have been reported in the previous 24 hours.

This means that today’s reported number of new cases reflects fewer than 24 hours of data, while Monday’s update will reflect more than 24 hours of data. Monday’s website update will reflect cases not included in today’s update because of the data delivery system disruption as well as additional cases identified on Sunday. The disruption did not affect today’s updates on recoveries, deaths, and hospitalizations.

The Maine CDC did not report any additional deaths of people with COVID-19. The state death toll remains at 147.

The Maine CDC reported 47 additional cases Sunday.

Of the 6,715 total COVID-19 cases in Maine, 5,944 are confirmed by test and 771 are probable.

488 Mainers have been hospitalized due to their COVID-19 illnesses.

 5,554 Mainers have recovered from COVID-19.

Credit: NCM

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 31

The Maine CDC reports 1 new death due to COVID-19. The state death toll is now 147.

The Maine CDC reported an additional 98 cases Saturday.

Of the 6,668 total COVID-19 cases in Maine, 5,907 are confirmed by test, and 761 are probable.

486 Mainers have been hospitalized at some point during their COVID-19 illnesses.

 5,517 Mainers have recovered from COVID-19.

Halloween

"Halloween can be done safely and my recommendation is for folks to take a good look at the guidance," Dr. Shah said. "The guidance spells out the best ways, the safest ways for folks to celebrate Halloween"

Dr. Shah said he's more worried about adult Halloween gatherings than he is about trick-or-treating. He reiterated the importance of wearing a mask and taking proper precautions when hanging out with people outside your home.

RELATED: CDC issues Halloween guidance, discourages traditional trick-or-treating

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30

The Maine CDC did not report any additional deaths of people with COVID-19 on Friday.

146 deaths

103 new cases

6,570 total COVID-19 cases in Maine 

5,829 confirmed by test

741 probable

486 Mainers have been hospitalized at some point during their COVID-19 illnesses

5,495 Mainers have recovered from COVID-19

Credit: NCM

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29

The Maine CDC did not report any additional deaths of people with COVID-19. The state death toll remains at 146.

The Maine CDC reported an additional 80 cases Thursday, which means 330 additional cases have been reported over the past five days. None of the 80 cases reported Thursday are part of an outbreak that Maine CDC is aware of.

Of the 80 additional cases reported Thursday, 28 percent were from Cumberland County, 18 percent were from Somerset County, and 15 percent were from York County. Maine CDC Director Dr. Nirav Shah said Somerset County is particularly concerning, after logging seven additional cases on Wednesday and 19 additional cases on Thursday.

"What's important and concerning in Somerset County is that there is no new outbreak investigation in any facility in that county, let alone one that accounts for the increase of 26 cases in two days," Dr. Shah said. "Based on what we know right now, this is strong evidence of community transmission all throughout Somerset County."

10 of the 80 additional cases reported Thursday are among healthcare workers who work in different locations. Another 10 cases are among people who study or work in nine different schools across Maine.

Of the 6,467 total COVID-19 cases in Maine, 5,749 are confirmed by test and 718 are probable.

483 Mainers have been hospitalized at some point during their COVID-19 illnesses.

 5,462 Mainers have recovered from COVID-19.

Maine's 7-day positivity rate now stands at .8 percent. One week ago, Maine's 7-day positivity rate was .5 percent and two weeks ago it was .42 percent. 

Maine's testing volume is 470 tests per every 100,000 people. Dr. Shah noted that this testing volume is near Maine's all-time high point. He said this is a good thing because it shows and suggests that Maine has the capacity to identify new cases and take public health action with them before there is too much spread.

New Outbreaks

There are 10 cases associated with the Pat's Pizza location in the Old Port in Portland. Dr. Shah said most of the cases are among guests. He said Maine CDC has identified two particular evenings where there seems to have been a high degree of transmission: Oct. 16 and Oct. 22. He said anyone who may have visited the restaurant on one of those nights should consider getting tested.

There are three cases (one resident and two staff members) associated with the Durgin Pines retirement community in Kittery. Maine CDC became aware of these cases due to periodic universal testing being conducted by the facility.

Outbreak Updates

There are now a total of 12 cases associated with Woodlands Memory Care of Rockland. Maine CDC anticipates a likelihood of more cases as more test results are returned.

There remain a total of 27 cases associated with the Second Baptist Church in Calais.

There remain a total of 60 cases associated with the Brooks Pentecostal Church in Waldo County.

Credit: NCM

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28

The Maine CDC did not report any additional deaths of people with COVID-19. The state death toll remains at 146.

The Maine CDC reported an additional 76 cases Wednesday, which means 250 additional cases have been reported over the past four days (Sunday-Wednesday). About 21 percent of the additional cases reported Wednesday are in Cumberland County; 19 percent are in York County; Knox and Washington Counties each account for about 12 percent.

Just in the past 24 hours, Maine has seen new cases in 14 of Maine's 16 counties, including 11 in Knox County, nine in Washington County, seven in Somerset County, and three in Aroostook County.

Of the 76 additional cases reported Wednesday, 14 are among children younger than 18. The 76 cases range from 8 months old to 94 years old.

Of the 6,387 total COVID-19 cases in Maine, 5,670 of these cases are confirmed by test and 717 are probable.

484 Mainers have been hospitalized at some point during their COVID-19 illnesses. In the past 30 days alone, 33 people have been hospitalized. 16 people are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 in Maine—seven of whom are being treated in intensive care. Hospitalizations have doubled in Maine over the past week. Maine CDC Director Dr. Nirav Shah said although they remain low, that increase is significant.

 5,441 Mainers have recovered from COVID-19.

Maine's 7-day positivity rate now stands at .75 percent. One week ago, Maine's 7-day positivity rate was .5 percent and two weeks ago it was .42 percent. Dr. Shah called this a "significant increase." Dr. Shah said testing volumes in Maine have been largely steady.

"Overall what is happening in Maine right now is sustained increasing levels of transmission in communities across our state," Dr. Shah said. "We know that because our testing volume has remained roughly the same at a time when our positivity rates and our hospitalization rates have been increasing."

Dr. Shah said it's also important to differentiate between what we're seeing now and what we saw in May. He said the numbers we're seeing now are roughly similar to the ones we saw in May, however the epidemiological stories they tell are different.

"In May, the increase is cases was being driven by focal outbreaks in congregate care settings and congregate living settings: nursing homes, shelters for people experiencing homelessness, and so on," Dr. Shah said. "Today, the numbers and the increases in cases that we are seeing are being driven by the fact that the virus is everywhere among us. In May we were all staying home, so we had very few close contacts. But today we're out and about, which means that the virus can and has been hitching a ride and traveling farther and wider across the state, from home to home to home."

Dr. Shah reiterated that the virus is affecting every part of the state, every age group, every county, and every walk of life. He said it could quickly turn into exponential growth in Maine. In numerical terms, Dr. Shah explained exponential growth as occurring if, for example, Maine's 76 additional cases on Wednesday turned into about 140 cases per day for a few days and then 300 cases per day for a few days, etc.

"(Exponential growth) would be the worst case scenario but it's a scenario that can happen to us. I say that because it's a scenario that right now is happening in other states," Dr. Shah said. "Let's not let that happen here. Let's make sure we take this opportunity to get a handle on where things are with COVID-19 in our state."

"It appears that we may be following the route of other states in entering another wave of the virus," Gov. Janet Mills said. "The question before us now is the same one we faced back in March: can we control it? And the answer depends on every one of us. We know that we in Maine are not immune from this virus, this silent enemy."

Mills added that the virus thrives on complacency, saying we can't wait for it to take more lives and cripple more communities.

"You may think you're at risk but don't be fooled. Don't be fooled," she said.

"Maine has led the nation in many ways. The question for us is will we be a beacon of hope to our fellow Americans, lighting the path to life with the virus while we await an effective vaccine and treatment? Or will we be yet another evening news headline about another state crippled with COVID-19? The answer depends on every one of us."

Both Mills and Shah acknowledged the fatigue that all Mainers must be feeling but also posed the question: is not abiding by COVID-19 precautions worth the risk?

"We in Maine are not quitters. We care about each other. We will continue to care for each other," Mills said. "We will not give up. We will not surrender our mutual safekeeping, our responsibility to one another. We've endured so much before, over many decades in our history."

Outbreak Updates

There are now a total of 27 cases associated with the Second Baptist Church in Calais, an increase of 23 cases compared to Tuesday. Of the 27 cases, 18 are among people who attended at least one service at the church and nine are among their close contacts.

There are now a total of twelve cases associated with Woodlands Memory Care of Rockland. 

There remain a total of 60 cases associated with the Brooks Pentecostal Church in Waldo County.

Credit: NCM

MONDAY AND TUESDAY UPDATES

RESOURCES

Coronavirus, COVID-19 Background

The official name for the coronavirus is “SARS-CoV-2” and the disease it causes is named “coronavirus disease 2019” or “COVID-19” for short. Coronavirus is a family of viruses, which can infect people and animals. The viruses can cause the common cold or more serious diseases like SARS, MERS, and COVID-19.

The CDC says symptoms of the coronavirus include fever, cough, difficulty breathing, and in some cases sore throat.

The CDC says there are simple steps to take to reduce the possible spread of COVID-19:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use alcohol-based hand sanitizer
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands
  • Stay home while you're sick and avoid close contact with others
  • The Maine Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is holding coronavirus briefings on Tuesdays and Thursdays with director Dr. Nirav Shah to keep the public up to date on the situation in Maine

NEWS CENTER Maine YouTube COVID-19 Playlist