BANGOR, Maine — Even in the middle of a pandemic, the blooming flowers throughout downtown Bangor tell us spring is here. 

Returning for its seventh season, a project in downtown Bangor, Adopt-A-Garden, aims to keep the City of Bangor beautiful.

"I like the concept of volunteers doing it and being out and about," Dori Karnis said.

Dori adopted a garden four years ago and has been keeping it ever since. This year she will plant some perennials. 

You and your business can be part of it, too. Thirty spots are still open to the public for adoption.

"Every year the footprint expands a little bit, eventually they'll be adopt-a-gardens through the entirety of downtown," downtown Bangor coordinator Betsy Lundy said.

It's free to adopt but you can also sponsor a spot and everyone—no matter where you live—can adopt a garden.

This guideline is an adopter gardening guide provided by the Downtown Bangor Beautification Committee. 

"I keep gallons of water in my car, and again I just to by, stop for 10 minutes, pour some water...it's easy..it's fun!" Karnis said.

You can plant your favorite flower, fruit, or vegetable.

"They really do reflect the individuality of different people and organizations that have adopted them," Lundy said.

"To kick off the season, the Downtown Bangor Partnership will host a 'Big Dig' week from May 9-17. The Big Dig has been extended to a week-long event to allow adopt-a-gardeners to maintain proper social distance," Lundy said. "We also encourage gardeners to garden with members of their household. There will be truckloads of mulch, generously donated by The City of Bangor, available to gardeners at the throughout the Big Dig."

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For people, groups, or businesses who want to help but cannot commit to keeping the garden for the season, donations and sponsorships are also accepted.  

To make a donation or inquire about sponsorship, please email downtown@bangormaine.gov or call (207) 659-4160.

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