SAN DIEGO COUNTY, Calif. — It has been a month since the stay-at-home orders took effect -- forcing some businesses to close and schools to shut down. Unfortunately, thousands of San Diegans also lost their jobs. 

While some residents are struggling with their budgets, some may find they are spending less in some areas like gas, childcare, transportation, and entertainment. 

Homesnacks co-founder created the website Coronavirus ka-ching! Money saving calculator, which is calculating an average savings of $1,700 a month for some individuals.  

“I looked at my checking account and I thought why do I have so much money? If you have three children and active lifestyle, you are going to be saving a lot of money,” said Homesnacks co-founder, Nick Johnson.

Some San Diegans may find they are spending less in going out, but their utility bills like electricity and water are slightly higher. 

Depending on where one lives the average prices may vary, but Homesnacks calculated each takeout food is about $10 per person, going to bars is about $40 a trip, commute saving is about $.59 a mile each way, and childcare savings is about $900 a month.

Once all those figures are calculated, the average savings is about $1,700 a month.

Many San Diegans said they were saving on gas, nails, massages, and movies.

One man said he is catching up on bills instead of going to the casino. Others said the cost of food is out of control. 

“I hope everyone gets back to normal because I think things were fine the way they were,” said Johnson.

While many are seeing some savings with the sudden change in spending habits, only time will tell if some of the money saving habits stick around for the long run. 

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