BRUNSWICK (NEWS CENTER Maine) -- Many times, when people think of those who are food insecure, they picture a homeless person, someone without a job, extreme poverty, and that is not always the case.

"I felt kind of bad," said Tracey Peck-Moad. "I felt guilty taking it, figuring I was taking from people who are in a much different place than I am."

About four years ago, Tracey found herself in a place she'd never imagined she'd be. Tracey didn't fit the stereotypical mold that often comes to mind regarding people in need of food.

"I'm college educated. I was employed. I had four children. I had a roof over my head. I was still food insecure."

Tracey, who teaches physical education at elementary schools in Brunswick, no longer goes to the food pantry but she is still very much involved.

"We have a backpack program where we send food home with kids for the weekend who qualify. I am always working hard to get those families to ask for it, it's okay. I want to dispel the stereotype to anyone that will listen so people understand that help is there and they need to take advantage of it."